DELIVERY ONLY €7.90 FOR 30KG ANYWHERE IN IRELAND!

Fruit Hill Farm - Ireland's organic farm and garden specialists | Contact Us | 027 50710

Grow-How

Regular expert advice from Fruit Hill Farm on organic growing.
  • Rye Bother?

    The terms ‘Rye’ and ‘Ryegrass’ can be confusing. They both refer to plants which belong to the grasses (Poaceae family) and their uses overlap. However, they are not the same species. Rye (Secale cereale) is a cereal grain closely related to wheat and barley. It is grown for grain that produces deep flavourful breads but also as a forage and cover crop. On the other hand, ryegrasses (Lolium spp.) are used primarily as high quality forage and fodder grasses as well as catch crops - perennial ryegrass is what you mostly see when gazing wistfully out over the
  • Flea Beetle and How to Control Them

    Why are there holes in my Rocket? These tiny (and unsightly) holes that have appeared (often suddenly) in the leaves of young Brassica plants are the distinctive damage of the rarely seen Flea Beetle and can be very off-putting to the beginner gardener. WHAT ARE FLEA BEETLES The term Flea Beetle is used to describe a number of different species of beetles of the Chrysomelidae and they are found throughout the World. Flea Beetles are very small (usually 2- 3mm in size), shiny and oval shaped, and they can be dark blue, greenish purple or black in colour. As their name
  • Ladybirds in the garden - the benefits they bring and how to identify them

    Ladybirds (or ladybugs if you prefer) tend to be more prominent after a spell of hot weather like we have just had, and we have noticed that we are fortunate enough to have some in our garden. If you are not familiar with Ladybirds larva you may be inclined to think that it is a pest that you should think about getting rid of.  However having ladybirds in your garden is of great benefit to any organic gardener as they help to eliminate destructive pests like aphids, mites and scale insects. How to identify Ladybird Eggs The female ladybird will lay 10-50 eggs on a
  • Regenerative Gardening: Looking after the invisible!

    I was fortunate to meet Alex Podolinski in the late 90's at a meeting in Camphill Duffcarrig in Wexford. He is a Biodynamic pioneer and basically the founder of Australian Biodynamic farming as it exists now. He was also one of the first people to recognize that plants have two types of root systems, one for the uptake of water, which supports the transpiration process; and much finer white "hair roots" which are the feeder roots. In artificially fertilized systems the latter are often impaired or even destroyed as most of the nutrients in such a system are supplied in
  • Late early potatoes...it is not too late to plant early potatoes!

    Many of you have delayed planting potatoes due to the cold weather, but fear not, it's not too late to plant early potatoes - you'll just have a later crop of early potatoes! There seems to be a misconception out there that early potatoes have to be planted early and late potatoes later. The "early" and "late" actually refers to the time when they are going to be ready for harvest.  An early variety matures much faster (and will be earlier)  than a late variety (which takes longer to grow and will be later). Early varieties are Vitabella, Casablanca, Colleen,
  • Planting & Growing 'Flavor' Softneck Garlic in Spring

    Flavor Softneck garlic is a an organic Garlic for Spring planting. Flavor Garlic has lovely ivory/pink cloves of fine flavour.  Can be used green in salads or left to mature for cooking.  Wonderful roasted whole in olive oil with new potatoes and rosemary. Choosing a Site and soil for your garlic Choose an open, sunny site and well-drained soil. High humidity around the foliage and wet soils make the crop more prone to disease. Prior to planting, improve the soil’s structure, moisture retention and nutrient levels by incorporating organic matter. Apply about two
  • Guide to Growing Potatoes for Beginners - 6 Tips for Success

    What could be nicer than digging your own early potatoes out of the home garden? Potatoes are a relatively easy crop to grow, but here are 6 top tips to increase the chance of success. Chit before planting to give the plants a head start when planting. To chit/sprout leave the seed potatoes in trays with their eyes up in a light cool, frost free room. (Read more about chitting potatoes HERE) Fertilize soil well to achieve a good yield and quality. Potatoes need enough Nitrogen to produce good stalks and leaves, Phosphorus for good root growth and Potash for yield,
  • What are certified seed potatoes?

    Cerified seed potatoes are seed that has been certified for purity and freedom from disease by the Dept of Agriculture.  Each seed crop is inspected to confirm the identity of the variety, to ensure that it meets the minimum level of varietal purity and that it meets certain plant health and pest infection standards. The Irish Department of Agriculture where the first official body in Europe to establish a Seed Potato Certification Scheme in 1918. This ensured variety purity and disease and virus freedom.  You should only buy seed potatoes that are
  • Guide to Growing Early Potatoes and Chitting

    Early earlies are a treat to be savoured – and to get them on your plate in April/May you need to make a start now in December/January. Early potatoes have a short growing season – that is they will reach maturity within 10-12 weeks of planting depending on the severity of the weather.  Colleen, Casablanca, Sharpe’s Express or Red Duke of York are all reliable, tasty early varieties. Orla and British Queens (although officially these are second early varieties) can also be planted now for an early crop. Chitting potatoes Chitting is basically another word for
  • Introduction to Pruning

      The country’s trees have taking quiet a bashing this year and many of us are still clearing up damaged and felled trees. We can make the best of it by stocking up the woodshed and plan some winter pruning while we’re at it. With some exceptions, most trees are pruned in winter anyways. This is largely because deciduous plants go dormant in the winter and so less stress is received by the plant. There are other reasons for winter pruning. All the energy of the plant has been drawn in to its roots in the winter. This means the plant will have a large

11-20 of 49

This website or its third-party tools use cookies, which are necessary to its functioning and are required to achieve the purposes illustrated in the privacy statement. If you want to know more or withdraw your consent to all or some of the cookies, please refer to the Privacy Statement. By closing this banner, scrolling this page, clicking a link or continuing to browse otherwise, you agree to the use of cookies. View our privacy statement for more information
x