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Organic Issues

  • What are Green Manures?

    Green Manures, also referred to as fertility building crops, may be broadly defined as crops grown for the benefit of the soil. A wide range of plant species can be used as green manures. Different ones bring different benefits. If the most is to be made from green manure crops it is important that they are carefully integrated into the crop rotation and proper attention paid to their cultivation. Advantages -  Increased biological activity  Improved soil structure and drainage  Reduced erosion and leaching  Increased supply of nutrients available to plants
  • Klasmann Organic Compost

    To be sure of good strong healthy plants, consistent high quality substrates are paramount. Manufacturing of such products for the many different sectors of horticulture requires not only a vast amount of experience, but also continuous research, on site laboratories and an efficient production plant. There are only few companies in Europe which fulfil these criteria, and Klasmann-Deilmann is one of them. Klasmann Deilmann, based in Germany, has been manufacturing substrates for more than 100 years. They were also one of the first companies to make certified
  • Attracting Wildlife in the Garden

    Provide as many habitats as possible and make the most of the ones you have Lawns Lawns provide a home for many insects that are eaten by birds and other wildlife. You can improve your lawn for wildlife by simply avoiding the use of weed killers and artificial fertilizers. Providing areas of grass of different heights, which are cut at different times of the year, optimises food potential. Grow clover in your lawn. Clovers are of great value to bees, which will pollinate your plants, as a source of nectar. Hedges Consider a hedge rather than a fence. For every foot of
  • Open pollinated seeds

    January is always a good time to be thinking about seeds - what you're going plant, what to buy, what you want to grow and how much you need. All our seeds are open pollinated and organic/bio-dynamic. View our full selection HERE The vast majority of our seeds come from Lincolnshire in England and are produced by a community owned seed company - the Seed Co-operative - not a large multinational but a group of committed individuals who care about open -pollinated seeds. From their own web-site they state -  "We grow seeds for everyone, and for the health and well
  • World Soil Day 2016

      Soil is vital to humankind. Over 99 percent of human foods come from the earth. Soil is more than just the dirt under our feet. It is a home for living organisms and it provides nutrients and stability for plants to grow. Without soil, the plants necessary for people and animals to survive could not exist.  Erosion, sealing, loss of organic matter, compaction, salinisation, landslides and contamination have negative impacts on human health, food security, natural ecosystems, biodiversity and climate, as well as on our economy. -99% of our food comes directly
  • Seeds for grassland, forage and soil fertility

    Research is confirming that a diverse mix of grasses, legumes and other plants improves pasture and grassland for soil health, animal health and for wildlife. The Organic Research Centre in the UK has published a summary of results from a recent study that clearly shows the benefits of incorporating more than two species of legumes to help build soil fertility: Legumes: building soil fertility (pdf file) Legumes such as clover help build soil fertility They also found that including different grasses in the mix helped: "There are benefits from the inclusion of
  • Controlling blight using organic methods

    It's the time of year to start thinking about preventing blight - especially in your potato crop. There are now some excellent blight resistant varieties suitable for organic growers. We saw great demand for these this spring and sold out quickly. We'll make sure to have as many blight resistant varieties as possible next year. Another way to avoid blight is simply to grow earlies or 2nd earlies and get them harvested before blight takes hold. This does mean that you may not get such a large yield, and may not be suitable for people looking to store through the

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